Richard Jackson - Recipient of the 54th Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer


Richard Jackson - Recipient of the 54th Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer


THE AWARD:

The Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer recognizes the outstanding accomplishments by lawyers of the career service employed by the United States Government in the District of Columbia or by the Government of the District of Columbia. This award is named in honor of Justice Tom C. Clark, a former National President of the Federal Bar Association, for his distinguished career as a government attorney. During his career, Justice Clark served as Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, and first Director of the Federal Judicial Center. The District of Columbia Chapter of the Federal Bar Association annually solicits nominees for the award from more than 80 governmental agencies. Previous recipients are a distinguished group of dedicated federal servants, who were recognized within their agencies, and by the Federal Bar Association, for their outstanding service to their respective federal agencies as federal government lawyers.

THE RECIPIENT:

The District of Columbia Chapter of the Federal Bar Association is pleased to announce the selection of the 54th recipient of the Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer: Colonel Richard Jackson (Ret.) who served as the Special Assistant to the Judge Advocate General (U.S. Department of the Army) during his 40 years of service in the U.S. Army.

Colonel Jackson graduated in the top 2% of his class at West Point in 1976. He was then assigned to Ranger and Airborne School after which he served in Panama. Upon his selection as one of 12 officers to attend law school with the FLEP, a fellowship program for active duty officers, he attended Georgetown University Law School from which he graduated in 1983. He then returned to the Army as a Judge Advocate officer, where he was on active duty for 30 years. During his career, he served in key roles and commands, including:

1983-1986: Chief of Criminal Law, Office of the Staff Judge Advocate, Special Operations Command (Fort Bragg, North Carolina)
1987-1990: Senior Defense Counsel, Trial Defense Service, and Legal Advisor, Empire Range Prisoner of War Camp (Fort Clayton, Panama)
1990-1993: Chief of Criminal Law, Office of the Staff Judge Advocate, and Legal Advisor, Joint Task Force Six – Counterdrug (Fort Bliss, Texas)
1994-1996: Deputy Staff Judge Advocate, U.S. Atlantic Command (Norfolk, Virginia)
1996-1998: Professor of Law and Chair, International and Operational Law Department, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School (Charlottesville, Virginia)
1998-2000: Staff Judge Advocate, U.S. Army Special Operations Command (Fort Bragg, North Carolina)
2000-2002: Staff Judge Advocate, 25th Infantry Division and Multinational Division North (Bosnia) (Schofield Barracks, Hawaii)
2002-2004: Staff Judge Advocate, U.S. Army Pacific (Fort Shafter, Hawaii)
2004-2005: Legal Advisor, Joint Forces Command, NATO Southern Region (Naples, Italy)

From 2005 until his recent retirement in June 2016, Colonel Jackson served as the Special Assistant to the Judge Advocate General for Law of War Matters.

During his long career with the U.S. Army Colonel Jackson routinely advised senior Army leaders. His portfolio included the law of armed conflict issues, ranging from policy and doctrine to practical guidance to the field. He was the Army’s foremost expert in arms control treaties and reviewed all weapons systems fielded by the Army. Colonel Jackson also served in broader roles within the Department of Defense as a member of the DoD Law of War Working Group, contributing not just insight but also hundreds of pages of research and policy analysis to the drafting of the Department of Defense Law of War Manual. He also coordinated the integration of law of war with NATO, the Red Cross and the International Criminal Court. In his work with these entities, Colonel Jackson was regarded as the Army's foremost expert on nuanced legal disciplines involving the overlay of the law of war, international human rights law, and international law generally. He was regularly tasked to consider the investigation and prosecution of war crimes, along with the complex substantive and procedural issues impacting such investigations, and the challenging jurisdictional questions raised by the prosecutions. Even while carrying these weighty responsibilities, throughout his career Colonel Jackson maintained exceptionally close ties to the academic and public interest communities connected to these issues.

Colonel Jackson has also been an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center, teaching the law of war, and an instructor with the defense Institute of International Legal Studies. He also regularly participated in missions to bring law of war knowledge to developing nations. Colonel Jackson has held numerous leadership and membership positions for private organizations, including: Vice President of the United States Committee of the Blue Shield, Ambassador and former Chair of the Lieber Society Interest Group of the American Society of International Law, Counselor for the Judge Advocates' Association Inns of Court, member of the Executive Committee of the Military Society of Law and War, and member of the Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Protection Law, and the Institution of Humanitarian Law.

He has written 23 law review articles and publications, and has served as panelist, moderator and lecturer at more than 20 gatherings of international law experts, including gatherings abroad. Colonel Jackson has played a critical role in developing, researching and writing books, chapters and monographs in publications used daily by practitioners in the field and students of the law of armed conflict, including desk books used by The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, The NATO Legal Advisor’s Handbook, The Department of Defense Law of War Manual, and the U.S. Army’s The Counter-Insurgency Manual. Colonel Jackson has also mentored many young attorneys in mock trials and met with experts to address international cultural preservation of sites which so often become casualties of armed conflict. His work to prevent the destruction of such sites has prompted an increased awareness of this issue within the Department of the Army and the Department of Defense seldom seen since the famous “Monuments Men” work of the Second World War. Colonel Jackson’s work in this area has directly contributed to the removal of at least one historic site from a targeting list, enabling that rich cultural heritage to live on for future generations. Moreover, his efforts are serving to change the mindset of military leaders within the US and beyond regarding the necessity to carefully consider and safeguard such sites.

The District of Columbia Chapter of the Federal Bar Association is honored to have had the opportunity to select such a distinguished example of a dedicated federal government lawyer for the 54th Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer.
Previous Recipients of the Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer

David J. Anderson, U.S. Department of Justice
Paul A. Sweeney, U.S. Department of Justice
Kendall W. Barnes, U.S. Department of Justice
John W. Carlock, U.S. Department of Treasury
William A. Paisley, U.S. Department of Justice
Richard Solomon, Federal Power Commission
Charles R. Simpson, Internal Revenue Service
Dr. Charles J. Zinn, Judiciary Committee, U.S. House of Representatives
Leo Pellerzi, Civil Service Commission
Ralph S. Spritzer, Office of the Solicitor General
Robert W. Ginnane, Interstate Commerce Commission
Beatrice Rosenberg, U.S. Department of Justice
Philip A. Loomis, Jr., Securities and Exchange Commission
Sidney A. Saperstein, U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare
Morton J. Hollander, U.S. Department of Justice
Julia P. Cooper, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Mark M. Richard, U.S. Department of Justice
John A. Rizzo, Central Intelligence Agency
Baddia J. Rashid, U.S. Department of Justice
Daniel M. Friedman, U.S. Department of Justice
Leon Ulman, U.S. Department of Justice
Irving P. Margulies, U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development
Victor W. Caputy, U.S. Attorney’s Office
Jane M. Edmisten, Merit Systems Protection Board
Seth D. Zinman , U.S. Department of Labor
Thomas L. Hemingway, U.S. Air Force
James H. Michel, U.S. Department of State
Jerome M. Felt, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
William C. Bryson, U.S. Department of Justice
Frances L. White, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Paul Gonson, Securities and Exchange Commission
Lawrence G. Wallace, Office of the Solicitor General
Michael J. Matheson, U.S. Department of State
Alan J. Kreczko, U.S. Department of State
Steven Y. Winnick, U.S. Department of Education
William R. McLucus, Securities and Exchange Commission
James H. Thessin, U.S. Department of State
James Feldman, Office of the Solicitor General
The Honorable Stanley Sporkin, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia
Eric H. Holder, Jr., U.S. Attorney, District of Columbia
Edwin S. Kneedler, Office of the Solicitor General
Todd F. Buchwald, U.S. Department of State
Joseph P. Baum, US Coast Guard, Court of Criminal Appeals
Nancy J. Marks, Internal Revenue Service
Douglas N. Letter, U.S. Department of Justice
Jacob H. Stillman, Securities and Exchange Commission
Joseph H. Rouse, U.S. Army Claims Service
Michael R. Dreeben, Office of the Solicitor General
John C. Keeney, U.S. Department of Justice
The Honorable Royce C. Lamberth, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia
Jason R. Baron, National Archives and Records Administration